Feedstock for 150,000 TPA Organic Material Recovery Center

Lystek Contract to Divert Class B Biowaste from Landfill in California

Lystek International, which uses thermal hydrolysis to treat organic wastes, has been awarded a multi-year contract by the City of Petaluma, California for Diversified Reuse of Biosolids.

Image © Lystek International

Lystek International, which uses thermal hydrolysis to treat organic wastes, has been awarded a multi-year contract by the City of Petaluma, California for Diversified Reuse of Biosolids.Under the terms of the agreement, Lystek will accept Class B Biosolids generated in Petaluma and convert them into LysteGro®, a US EPA, Class A EQ (Exceptional Quality) biofertilizer product at its 150,000 tonne, Organic Material Recovery Center.

Opened in August 2016, the company said that the plant was developed in a PPP style partnership and it is rapidly contributing to the its overall ability to divert hundreds of thousands of tonnes of biosolids from North American landfills annually.

The LysteGro product made at the plant has secured a Class A EQ classification from the US EPA, a license from the California Department of Food and Agriculture as bulk fertilizer and acceptance as an agricultural product by the Solano County Department of Agriculture.  

The company said that these recognitions remove the traditional barriers and prohibitions imposed on historical, Class B land application practices.  

As such, it said that demand for its end product is outpacing supply with all initial production of the available material being sold to local farmers and ranchers in a four-month period and a growing waiting list for the fall, 2017 fertilizer application season. 

“With a progressive approach to biosolids management and a strong sense of environmental responsibility, the City of Petaluma was one of the first agencies to engage with us,” said Kurt Meyer, President of Lystek.  

“This agreement marks the sixth customer seeking affordable, sustainable, year-round organics management in the San Francisco Bay area from our innovative, resource recovery center,” he added.

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