Recycling Principles Laid Out Following Greenpeace Protest

Reuse & Recycling Plan for Samsumg’s 4.3m Recalled Galaxy Note 7 Devices

Following its exploding batteries debacle, Samsung Electronics has established three principles to ensure that Galaxy Note 7 devices are reused and recycled.

Image © Samsung

Following its exploding batteries debacle, Samsung Electronics has established three principles to ensure that Galaxy Note 7 devices are reused and recycled.

In order to do this in an evironmentally sound fashion the company said that first, thedevices will be considered for reuse as refurbished phones or rental phones where applicable.

The second key principal that it said it would be following is to ensure that salvageable components will be removed for reuse.

Thirdly, the firm said that processes such as metal extraction will be performed using environmentally friendly methods.

However, the company added that regarding the Galaxy Note 7 devices as refurbished phones or rental phones, is dependent upon consultation with regulatory authorities and carrier, as well as local demand. The markets and release dates will be determined accordingly.

For remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices, components such as semiconductors and camera modules will be detached by companies specialising in such services and used for sample production testing purposes.

Finally, for left over components, Samsung said that it will first extract precious metals, such as copper, nickel, gold and silver by utilising “eco-friendly companies specialising in such processes”.

As part of its ongoing commitment to recycling, Samsung also said that it plans to join the EU’s R&D and test efforts to develop new eco-friendly processing methods.

Samsung’s recycling plans come after Greenpeace protestors interrupted the company’s Mobile World Congress keynote last month raising questions over what the manufacturer intended to do with the 4.3 million recalled devices. 

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