VIDEO: Microwave Energy Cuts Tyre Recycling GHG Emissions

Toronto, Ontario based Environmental Waste International has developed a microwave tyre recycling process that offers significantly lower carbon dioxide emissions.

Toronto, Ontario based Environmental Waste International (TSX VENTURE: EWS) has developed a microwave tyre recycling process that offers significantly lower carbon dioxide emissions.

More Waste Management World Articles

VIDEO 15,000 Tonne Tyre Blaze at Yorks Recycling Facility Visible from Space

Tackling Tyre Waste

VIDEO: Microwave Energy Cuts Tyre Recycling GHG Emissions

New Recycling Machine to Pulverise and Devulcanize Tyre Waste from Pallmann

£80m Tyre Recycling Pyrolysis Project Struggling to Finance Teesside Plant

Cutting the Risk of Landfill Fires

Largest Tyre Recycling Facility in UAE

Nano Technology Tyre Recycling Firm Secures Funding

According to the company the results of a report conducted by Canadian environmental consultancy, Pinchin Environmental, demonstrated that it Reverse Polymerization™ process and proprietary microwave delivery system significantly lower carbon dioxide emissions compared to the two most commonly used waste tire recycling options - incineration and crumb rubber recycling.

The Reverse Polymerization Process applies high intensity microwave energy through the company’s Microwave Delivery System in an oxygen free atmosphere, which it said reduces all organic compounds to their simplest form - in the case of tyres carbon black, steel, hydrocarbon gases and oil.

The process

The system directly applies the microwave energy to the tires as they pass through a nitrogen filled tunnel on a continuous basis. The company explained that nitrogen prevents the formation of hazardous by-products such as dioxins and furans that can form when oxygen is present.

The technology’s developer added that the process allows for a high level of processing control through the proprietary Microwave Delivery System which guides and monitors the microwave energy. Each magnetron is individually controlled allowing the system to continuously adjust the amount of energy being applied in any section of the tunnel.

According to the company, the carbon black produced is of high enough quality to be used in new rubber production or other feedstock, while the steel is sold for recycling. From a 20 lb (9.1 kg) tyre, 7 lbs (3.18 kg) of carbon black and 2.0 lbs (0.91 kg) of steel are recovered.

The remainder of the tyre (oil and hydrocarbon gases) can be reused in the production of electricity or sold for use in other applications, and EWS claimed that the process yields almost 100% reuse and recycling of the scrap tyre feed.

Reduced GHG emissions

According to EWS the results from the Pinchin report showed that its process emits significantly lower amounts of carbon dioxide compared to the actual and avoided emissions associated with each alternative.

The company claimed that the disposal of one million scrap tyres using its process emits 12,166 tonnes fewer CO2 equivalents compared to incineration, and 3136 tonnes fewerCO2 equivalents compared to the production of crumb rubber.

A video explaining the process further can be viewed below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svDRSqUaT84

Read More

VIDEO 15,000 Tonne Tyre Blaze at Yorks Recycling Facility Visible from Space
A serious fire at a recycling facility containing around 15,000 tonnes of tyres in Sherburn-in-Elmet, North Yorkshire has created a toxic plume of black smoke that is visible from space.

Tackling Tyre Waste
With the rapidly growing number of vehicles around the world, the disposal of end-of-life tyres is a growing issue. Often simply dumped by the million to pose a serious environmental, health and fire risk, the technology to recover higher value materials and energy from waste tyres is moving forward. By Ben Messenger

£80m Tyre Recycling Pyrolysis Project Struggling to Finance
Middlesbrough, UK based PYReco, which aims to develop an £80 million plant to recycle oil, gas, refined carbon black, and steel from end-of-life tyres on Teesside, is struggling to secure adequate investment.