Double Capability for Hook & Skip Loader

Harsh and True – Demountable Skiploarder

When is a skip-loader of no use? The answer? When you need a hooklift truck instead. Now skiptruck and hookloader manufacturer Harsh has an answer – a demountable skiploader!


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When is a skip-loader of no use? The answer? When you need a hooklift truck instead. Now skiptruck and hookloader manufacturer Harsh has an answer – a demountable skiploader!


The demountable skiploader unit developed by Harsh based on the requirements of specific customer demand, is designed to fit onto a chassis fitted with a conventional hook- lift system (Ro-Ro/hookloader), which in effect doubles its capability, enabling one single truck to load and transport containers from these two popular, but otherwise incompatible systems.

“We can run a single vehicle as a standard hookloader for one journey, then quickly change it to a skiploader for the next job,” explains Freddy McAlister, fleet engineer at Malcolm Construction, the operator of this interesting new innovation.

“In the past, we’ve had
to operate both types of truck
– sometimes on the same con- tract. Now we only need one to handle both types of container. It’s given us a real productivity boost and increased our fleet flexibility,” he adds.


Designed to work at 26 tonnes gross weight, the new
Harsh ‘HS14T Demountable Skiploader’ provides a 14 tonnes lift capacity (or 10 tonnes at 4250 mm maximum reach with telescopic arms extended) and is able to handle skips of all sizes up to 10 tonnes capacity.

Harsh director Adam Hargreaves is also upbeat about the wider sales potential for this new addi- tion to the Harsh product range.

“This is a great example not
just of joint teamwork between customer and supplier, but is also a demonstration of how we at Harsh are able to design and develop imaginative solutions to meet our customers’ require- ments,” he comments.

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