Researchers to Study Waste Molecules to Boost Biogas & Chemical Production

Verliant Sciences has teamed up with the University of California to analyse the separation of the molecular constituents of various waste streams for renewable energy and biomedical applications.

Verliant Sciences, a subsidiary of San Francisco based Verliant Energy, has teamed up with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) to analyse the separation of the molecular constituents of various waste streams for renewable energy and biomedical applications.

The company said that it has entered into a multi-year collaborative research and development agreement with the university to conduct the analysis, which it expects to have important waste reclamation, renewable energy, and biomedical applications.

The project will take a phased approach, and draw on the biomedical expertise of UCSF researchers, as well as the environmental research expertise, technology and industry experience of Verliant’s science team at every phase.

According to Verliant, the scientists participating expect the research to generate information that will expand the use of waste byproducts and increased anaerobic digestion efficiency, ultimately resulting in greater waste diversion potential.

“Verliant has already made great strides in the microbial digestion of organic wastes and this research will allow us to refine and improve our process and take us to the next level of waste reclamation and green energy,” commented Christopher Barry, Verliant’s science director, and longstanding Fellow of the Society of Biology in the UK.

Nancy Phillips, Ph.D., a chemist in the UCSF School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, who for over 20 years has specialized in the characterization and separation of small molecules added:

“Not enough is known about the molecular constituency of municipal waste or other waste streams, and investigating the bioconversion of wastes is relevant to resolving our global waste and energy problems.”


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