Plan to Transition the BMW Group to 100% Renewable Energy

SLIDESHOW: South African BMW Plant Receives First Energy from Waste

BMW South Africa’s Rosslyn production facility has received its first renewable energy from Bio2Watt’s organic waste fed anaerobic digestion biogas plant.

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Bild © Howling Hound Photography

The Bio2Watt biogas plant in Bronkhorstspruit is located on the premises of one of South Africa’s larger feedlots (Beefcor) in agricultural area of Gauteng.

 

The car manufacturer said that this location provides the project with proximity to key fuel supplies; grid access and sufficient water supplied by Beefcor’s storm water collection dams. The City of Tshwane is also a key supplier of waste to the project

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© Howling Hound Photography

BMW South Africa’s Rosslyn production facility has received its first renewable energy from Bio2Watt’s organic waste fed anaerobic digestion biogas plant.

 

According to BMW, 25% to 30% of the Rosslyn plant’s electricity requirement will now be generated from renewable sources under a ten year renewable energy agreement between BMW and renewables specialist Bio2Watt. 

© Howling Hound Photography

The Bio2Watt biogas plant in Bronkhorstspruit is located on the premises of one of South Africa’s larger feedlots (Beefcor) in agricultural area of Gauteng.

 

The car manufacturer said that this location provides the project with proximity to key fuel supplies; grid access and sufficient water supplied by Beefcor’s storm water collection dams. The City of Tshwane is also a key supplier of waste to the project

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Biogas is produced by the anaerobic digestion of organic waste. It then fuels a combined heat and power gas engine generator to produce electricity, which is exported to  the power grid for uptake by power purchasers such as BMW.

 

 

© Howling Hound Photography

The Bronkhorstspruit project in Gauteng is now operational and construction is due to commence on a second waste-to-energy project in the Western Cape. There are a number of additional projects in the pipeline. 

 

© Howling Hound Photography

The Bronkhorstspruit biogas plant processes around 40,000 tonnes per annum of cattle manure and a further 20,000 tonnes of mixed organic waste in two anaerobic digesters that produce the biogas feedstock for a combined heat and power application.

 

Sufficient water is supplied by Beefcor’s storm water collection dams. The City of Tshwane is also a key supplier of waste to the project.

© Howling Hound Photography

Sean Thomas, chief executive officer of Bio2Watt explained that biogas production offers a sustainable solution for the disposal of organic waste while offering large power users the ability to diversify their energy supply and reduce their carbon footprint by purchasing power from a green energy source at increasingly competitive rates.

 

According to the Southern African Biogas Industry Association biogas can contribute 2.5 GW generation capacity in the country, using wastewater, food waste, manure, agricultural residues and commercial processes including abattoirs, breweries and cheese factories. 

© Howling Hound Photography

Tim Abbott, managing director of BMW Group South Africa, said that there is a plan to transition the company’s production facilities to be 100% powered by  renewable sources by the year 2020. 

 

“We have increased the share of renewable energy as a percentage of total power consumed by the BMW Group to an impressive 51% in 2014," he said. "Our vision is to draw 100% of our energy requirements from renewable sources with the help of partners such as Bio2Watt.

 

“Sustainability is one of the main drivers of our business. We not only create added value for the environment and society, but also for the company itself – because sustainability management also cuts costs and generates revenues as well as profits."